This week on the bookish internet

  • Loganberry Books in Cleveland is doing something very clever for Women’s History Month. They’ve worked out a way to make you notice the women authors first. (Huffington Post)
  • Emily Temple ranks the best and worst literary muses. (LitHub)
    • On a side note, Helen Oyeyemi’s Mr. Fox was the most brilliant novel about muses and writing I’ve ever read. I highly recommend it, especially if you like books that will mess you up.
  • Scholars at the British Library think Jane Austen might have died from arsenic poisoning. Posthumous forensics is mostly pointless, but it sure is interesting. (New York Times)
  • Speaking of the British Library…on their Medieval Manuscripts blog, they’ve rounded up some of the oldest known works by women scribes. (Medieval Manuscripts Blog)
  • The book sniffing may have gone too far. Randy Kennedy writes about a library that has turned into a smell exhibit. (New York Times)
  • Sarah Laskow writes about why librarians find books by “anonymous” to be a pain in the tuchus. (Atlas Obscura)

This week on the bookish internet

  • The Mackenzie and Harris Type Foundry is probably the only kind of hot metal I would actually travel to see. (Atlas Obscura)
  • Jan Rosenberg is a strange bookish phenomena; she can actually get to the end of her to-read list. (Book Riot)
  • Lynn Neary reports on a new literary profession: sensitivity reader. (NPR)
  • Ellie Broughton ponders the popularity of lit-bots on Twitter. (LitHub)
  • Elizabeth Allen rounds up fourteen people you inevitably meet (but didn’t want to) at book groups. (Book Riot)
  • Eman Quotah has a thing or two to say about publishers who suddenly want to publish Muslim voices. (The Establishment)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Father Columba Stewart joins the ranks of the badass librarians by helping to save manuscripts from ISIS. (The Atlantic)
  • Daniel Pollack-Pelzner writes about the latest wave of Shakespeare revisionism. (The New Yorker)
  • Tirzah Price shares what she learned after being gifted a set of bookplates. (Book Riot)
  • Librarians are taking a stand against fake news and Trump. (The Guardian)
    • Of course, we’ve always been against fake news, but I have never seen so many syllabi and plans for classes by librarians to teach people how to recognize when they’re being manipulated by media.
  • On the fun side of things, Spencer Althouse rounded up literary tattoos from across the internet for our delectation. (Buzzfeed)

This fortnight on the bookish internet

  • Peter Derk has many theories about why grammar nazis drive us nuts. (LitReactor)
  • Zoe Dickinson shares her joy at meeting other bookish folk in her bookstore. (Book Riot)
  • Rivka Galchen and Benjamin Moser ponder two classic books that have been misunderstood. (New York Times)
  • Bookstores in major cities are hosting the Resistance. (New York Times)
  • George Sandeman reports on a major book heist in London. (The Guardian)
  • Would you pay £100 to visit this St. Petersburg Library for four hours? (The Guardian)
  • Trisha Brown makes a case against “women’s fiction” as a genre label. (Book Riot)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Learn more from Sophie Gilbert about Dr. Seuss’ anti-Nazi cartoons. (The Atlantic)
  • Zoe Dickinson apologizes to all the audiobooks she’s slept through. (Book Riot)
  • Rachel Wilkerson Miller tells the story of Emma Lazarus’ famous poem. (Buzzfeed)
  • In a bit of good political, bookish news, Virginia has tossed out the law requiring labeling on “sexually explicit” books…like Romeo and Juliet. (The Guardian)
    • Speaking of politics, sort of, here are some book recommendations from the seven countries affected by Trump’s Muslim ban. (Book Riot)
  • Jessa Crispin ponders why we enjoy dystopias so much. (The Baffler)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Lorraine Berry discusses the history of bibliomania and book hoarding. (The Guardian)
  • And speaking of humblebragging, Ashley Bowen-Murphy talks about the hardest books she’s ever read. (Book Riot)
  • Alison Ray shares a medieval illuminated manuscript that has an awful lot in common with modern comic books. (Medieval Manuscripts Blog)
  • Michiko Kakutani explains why we should all read 1984 now. (The New York Times)

This week on the bookish internet

  • I salute these street artists who correct graffiti in Quito. (mental_floss)
  • Lynne Truss shares the story of, possibly, the only author to be killed by a bad review. (The Guardian)
  • Boris Fishman has comically bad luck with translators of his work. (The New York Times)
  • And speaking of translation…Richard Lea rounds up a number of authors who are more popular in translation than they are in their native languages. (The Guardian)

This week on the bookish internet

  • I will never not share a round up of the weirdest things librarians have found in returned books. (Tin House Blog)
  • Zoe Dickinson works at a book store with no catalog! Here’s what she’s learned about navigating without a map. (Book Riot)
  • Looking for something funny to read? The Guardian asked some of the biggest names in fiction about their favorite funny books.
  • Things have gone very wrong with American education when a poet can’t answer questions about her work on two standardized tests. (Washington Post)
  • Courtney Tanner reports on books that are banned in the Utah prison system. (Salt Lake Tribune)
  • Emily Temple examines more than a century of books that have been called “the Great American novel.” What do you think? (LitHub)
  • Erin Blakemore digs up an excellent article from the JSTOR archives about underground publishing in the Netherlands during the Nazi occupation. (Daily JSTOR)

This fortnight on the bookish internet

I didn’t feel like posting a round-up of bookish links last week because of the election. So, here’s me catching up.

  • D.J. Taylor discusses the history of tone in book reviews and how the “hatchet job” goes in and out of fashion. (The New Statesman)
  • Joan Bertin and Millie Davis asked teens what banned books have meant to them and helped them. This compilation of quotations is powerful evidence of why we need difficult books: they help us grow up. (Boing Boing)
  • Have you ever heard of beta readers? Priya Sridhar explains this important, but rarely discussed, stage of book writing. (Book Riot)
  • Alaina Leary ponders disability in literature: how we get it wrong, how publishing gets it wrong, and how to improve. (The Establishment)
  • Amanda Diehl explains how becoming a regular library user helps her cope with her workaholic tendencies. I love a good “How I discovered the library” story. (Book Riot)