bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

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bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • The latest development in the alternate Nobel for Literature: readers get to vote! (Book Riot)
  • 2,000 Libros is soliciting donations to send books to children who have been forcibly separated from their parents and incarcerated by the American government. (2,000 Libros)
  • I have never heard of fairy tale writer Mary de Morgan, but I desperately want to read her stories now. (Folklore Thursday)
  • Designers share their process for creating the covers for 10 books. (Electric Literature)
  • There’s a challenge working its way through the bookish internet: if you could only have 100 books in your library, which one would you pick? (A Life in Books)
  • Kamishibai sounds utterly charming. (The Conversation)
  • Marcos Santiago Gonsalez has a brilliant piece about teaching writing, code-switching, and what they mean for young writers. (Electric Literature)
  • Do you need more poetry in your life, but don’t know where to start? Author Rabih Alameddine posts a poem every day (or more) from a wide range of poets. (The Art Divas)
bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • Melissa Ragsdale has created some long-needed etiquette for how to loan books to friends and then get them back. (Bustle)
  • Jamie Rigg reports on an early reading device that could compress Innocents Abroad onto just 13 tiny cards with even tinier print for a reader that looks guaranteed to make you go blind. (Engadget)
  • TMN has a brilliant write up of post-World War I literature, inspired by a trip to a special exhibit at the Tate Modern. If this is your jam, this post has tons of recommendations. (The Modern Novel)
  • Keri Blakinger writes about lawyer Amalia Beckner‘s quest to bring books to prisoners and the ongoing battles over arbitrary prison banned books lists. (Houston Chronicle)
  • Diane Mehta discusses women in the rare books trade and the value of women’s words. (The Paris Review)
  • Librarians held storytime at one of the end family separation protests last Saturday and I’m not crying, you’re crying. (School Library Journal)
  • There are plans to award an alternate Nobel Award for Literature and I more excited than I am for the actual (now delayed) award. (The Guardian)
bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • Sarah Gailey shares what they learned from a sensitivity reader and how it changed their life. (The Book Smugglers)
  • Translators pick their favorite untranslatable words. (mentalfloss)
  • Lorraine Boissoneault explores why we are so fascinated by historical what ifs in this short history of alternate history. (Smithsonian Magazine)
  • Mary Robinette Kowal writes about her realization that authors have a unique responsibility to their readers: writing stories that won’t be internalized in ways reinforce harmful stereotypes or erase diversity. (Tor)
  • Stephanie Vozza writes about what happened when she attempted to kick her reading into overdrive (just my little bookish joke, heh) and try to read 30 books in 30 days. (Fast Company)
  • Emily Temple has a list of 40 great villains from literature. (LitHub)
bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • Aminatta Forna discusses the decision authors make to write either non-fiction or fiction. (LitHub)
  • Cecilia Lyra and Katherine Marciniak write in praise of authors’ acknowledgements. (Book Riot)
  • Benjamin Samuel shares some special yoga poses for writers. (Electric Literature)
  • Erin Blakemore writes about the role American librarians played during the Cold War. (Daily JSTOR)
  • Faleena Hopkins has lost her suit to trademark the word “cocky.” (Moby Lives)
  • Don’t have time to read the classics? John Atkinson has summarized them in two panel cartoons for you. (LitHub)
  • I love literature, but I doubt that I will ever love an author’s work enough to shell out thousands for these kinds of relics. (Electric Literature)