This week on the bookish internet

This week on the bookish internet

  • Rebecca Hussey reflects on her changing attitude toward dark books. (Book Riot)
  • More fragments of books printed by William Caxton have been found. (Moby Lives)
  • Melissa Baron found the book she needed because another reader left it behind. (Book Riot)
  • Victoria Jaggard reports on newly recovered text from charred scrolls found at Herculaneum. (Smithsonian Magazine)
  • Many readers would argue that she has too many books on her to-read list, but Danika Ellis defends her list. (Book Riot)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Stacie Williams (rightly) throws library neutrality out the window. (LitHub)
  • Matt Grant reflects on his antipathy for well-loved books. (Book Riot)
  • I always get a kick out of reading rules and regs from medieval libraries. Personally, I wish we could chain our copies of the DSM-V to the shelves because they wander. (Medievalists.net)
    • Pair with this short piece about the need for marginalia. (Farnam Street)
  • Viet Thanh Nguyen lists great Vietnam War novels by Vietnamese authors. (New York Times)
  • Abbey Fenbert recalls her complicated relationship with books and puberty. (Catapult)
  • Steve Attardo talks about designing book jackets. (LitHub)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Sian Cain rounds up author cameos in films based on their books. (The Guardian)
  • Danika Ellis explains what happened when she read for 24 hours straight for Dewey’s Readathon. (Book Riot)
  • Kristen Twardowski offers some ways we can help fund libraries—apart from calling our Congress critters and asking them to save the IMLS or participating in EveryLibrary. (Book Riot)
  • Kristina Pino says we need more words for bookish emotions. I agree. (Book Riot)
  • Danuta Kean explains why she always reads the end of the book first. (The Guardian)
  • Pamela Paul has more bookish advice: read books you’ll hate. (The New York Times)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Maddie Rodriguez hypothesizes about what makes a great plot twist. (Book Riot)
  • Scott Esposito writes about the importance of writers who keep the tragedies of recent decades in our thoughts. (LitHub)
  • Deepali Agarwal explains why we need to take writers seriously when they tell us about sexism and racism in publishing. (Book Riot)
  • One more reason to love libraries: Lynchburg Public Library is feeding hungry kids. (WSET)
  • Doree Shafrir reflects on why book clubs don’t work for her. (Buzzfeed)
  • Rebecca Donnelly tweeted 17 things you can do for your public library. (Republished on Book Riot)
  • Nikki Griffiths writes about the efforts to rebuilt the Mosul Central Library. (Moby Lives)

This fortnight on the bookish internet

  • The folks at LitHub have rounded up some of the Library of Congress’ treasures for a special National Library Week post.
  • Peter Clark reports on how Syrian refugees are taking time to save books. (Moby Lives)
  • Adam Cozary makes delightfully zany GIFs with medieval illuminations. (TechCrunch)
  • Chloe Farand writes about the last librarian of Mosul. (The Independent)
  • Romeo Rosales writes about one of the American Library Association’s more adventurous moments: when they went to war. (Book Riot)
  • Matt Grant discusses the vexed question of supporting independent bookstores. (Book Riot)
  • A time capsule linked to Jules Verne has been found in southern France. (Digital Reader)
  • Like all readers, John Sherman understands that shelving books involves a lot more than the alphabet. (LitHub)
  • Reader Marianne has some advice for coping with your problematic favorites. (Boricuan Bookworms)

This fortnight on the bookish internet

  • You shouldn’t burn books for so many reasons, but here’s another reason if you needed it: you might accidentally burn your house down. (CNN: Be warned that a video plays on page load.)
  • Barbara Dee was told not to talk about her book at an author talk to sixth graders for fear of parental backlash. (Nerdy Book Club)
  • I’ve just added another place to my bucket list: the doomsday library in Svalbard. (Huffington Post)
  • This 400-year-old book is made of feathers! (Atlas Obscura)
  • Matthew Kirschenbaum takes a deep dive into the dark, bewildering world of illegal book downloads. (Public Books)
  • Elizabeth Allen explains the five stages of having overdue library books. With GIFs. (Book Riot)
  • Hannah Smothers writes about yet another book removed from the curriculum because of parental complaints. The target this time is a sweet book about a boy who wears a dress. (Cosmopolitan)
  • Emily Temple does sterling work rounding up the weird and amazing origins of classics. (LitHub)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Thomas Schiff traveled around the world to take beautiful panoramic photos of libraries. (The Guardian)
  • Sean Braswell wonders if von Goethe’s The Sorrows of Young Werther might be the deadliest book ever written. (ZY)
  • Lyndsay Faye’s article suggests that the difference between pastiche and fan fiction is a lot like the difference between pornography and erotica. (It’s pastiche or erotica if read it, otherwise it’s fan fiction or pornography.) (LitHub)
  • Lorraine Berry remembers when she met a man who doesn’t read books by women. (Signature)
  • Political Corner
    • Ashley Bowen-Murphy discusses what might happen to our bookish world if we don’t fight for the NEA and the NEHthe NEA and the NEH. (Book Riot)
    • Even if he weren’t one of my favorite authors, I would love Neil Gaiman for his defence of libraries. (The Guardian)
    • Please consider signing this Every Library letter to support PBS, NEA, NEH, and IMLS (the museum and libraries fund) to your Congressional representatives. (Every Library)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Loganberry Books in Cleveland is doing something very clever for Women’s History Month. They’ve worked out a way to make you notice the women authors first. (Huffington Post)
  • Emily Temple ranks the best and worst literary muses. (LitHub)
    • On a side note, Helen Oyeyemi’s Mr. Fox was the most brilliant novel about muses and writing I’ve ever read. I highly recommend it, especially if you like books that will mess you up.
  • Scholars at the British Library think Jane Austen might have died from arsenic poisoning. Posthumous forensics is mostly pointless, but it sure is interesting. (New York Times)
  • Speaking of the British Library…on their Medieval Manuscripts blog, they’ve rounded up some of the oldest known works by women scribes. (Medieval Manuscripts Blog)
  • The book sniffing may have gone too far. Randy Kennedy writes about a library that has turned into a smell exhibit. (New York Times)
  • Sarah Laskow writes about why librarians find books by “anonymous” to be a pain in the tuchus. (Atlas Obscura)

This week on the bookish internet

  • The Mackenzie and Harris Type Foundry is probably the only kind of hot metal I would actually travel to see. (Atlas Obscura)
  • Jan Rosenberg is a strange bookish phenomena; she can actually get to the end of her to-read list. (Book Riot)
  • Lynn Neary reports on a new literary profession: sensitivity reader. (NPR)
  • Ellie Broughton ponders the popularity of lit-bots on Twitter. (LitHub)
  • Elizabeth Allen rounds up fourteen people you inevitably meet (but didn’t want to) at book groups. (Book Riot)
  • Eman Quotah has a thing or two to say about publishers who suddenly want to publish Muslim voices. (The Establishment)