This week on the bookish internet

  • Dana Lee shares her bookish habits/rituals. I wish I was more interesting reader having read the list. I just plunk myself on the coach, wait to get covered in cats (3 seconds, tops), and read until I need to get up to go to the bathroom. (Book Riot)
  • Jo Lou asked a bunch of book designers about covers they rejected and the ones they accepted. (Electric Literature)
  • Callie Ryan Brimberry has a terrific example of the power of a book to connect strangers. (Book Riot)
  • I’ve always had a soft spot in my heart for the grawlix. (Words at Play)
  • Kristin Arnett shares what happens when librarians go DIY. (LitHub)
  • Laura Sackton reflects on what her favorite books share. (Book Riot)
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This week on the bookish internet

  • Erin Barnett asked other librarians about whether or not we lend books to people. It turns out that we’re surprisingly stingy most of the time—or maybe not so surprising in light of the fact that we know what people to do books they borrow. (Electric Literature)
  • James Jeffrey reports on the custody battle for hundreds of Ethiopian religious manuscripts that were looted by British soldiers in 1868. (Atlas Obscura)
  • Stuart Kells shares the story of how Aboriginal oral literatures were studied and misrepresented (and misunderstood) by Westerners. This sentence might sound a little dry, but it’s fascinating. If nothing else, I learned that Bruce Chatwin was kind of an asshole. (LitHub)
  • Kasia van Schaik reflects on what it means to be a single woman who reads. (Electric Literature)
  • Yep, people are still asking for books to be banned at their local libraries. (The Guardian)
  • Christine Hauser reports on what happened after teenagers were sentenced to books after committing race-related vandalism. (New York Times)

This week on the bookish internet

This week on the bookish internet

 

 

This week on the bookish internet

This week on the bookish internet

This week on the bookish internet

  • So it turns out there’s a centuries’ long history of hating poetry. (The Baffler)
  • The LitHub staff list the fictional houses they would like to live in/visit. I disagree with most of it. I read some of House of Leaves and I don’t even like being in the same room as a copy of the book; there’s no way in hell I would want to stay in that house.
  • Give Mary Wollstonecraft a statue! (The Guardian)
  • Christine Prevas tells a delightful story about how Shakespeare didn’t work at first in wooing her crush, but it did the second time. (Electric Lit)
  • I find this story about conservatives bewailing the fact that students sympathize with Frankenstein’s monster hilarious. (Gizmodo)
  • Should authors rate their own books? Nope! (Book Riot)