This week on the bookish internet

  • Dashka Slate reflects on a heretofore unexamined wrinkle in the push for diverse children’s literature: how should diversity be portrayed? (Mother Jones)
  • When people ask me what I read for fun I have a hard time giving a concise answer. Tracy Shipley’s not-concise answer is more eloquent than mine. (Book Riot)
  • Steven Price reflects on having Ellen Seligman as his editor. (Hazlitt)
    • I was particularly moved by this passage:
      • “[Ellen] believed the nature of words mattered because a work of literature, to her, was folded seamlessly out of the language itself. One needed to get it right and the only true obstacle to that was giving up, giving in, too soon..I believe a great part of her gift lay in an endlessly elastic ability to adapt and re-examine how a novel moved and came to life. It was a kind of alchemy, a fluid gesture.”

This week on the bookish internet

  • These stories explain why bibliophiles are so reluctant to lend their books. (Book Riot)
  • Jonathan Sturgeon explores the “Imperial Self” in American literary fiction, which I think helps explain why so much recent lit-fic is so tone deaf about, well, everything. (LitHub)
  • Good Housekeeping rounded up the best-selling novels from 1930 on so that we can see which book was a hit the year we were born. (Mine is Cujo. Go ahead and make your jokes.)
  • I will never get tired of prescriptivists getting smacked down by people who know better about language. (Buzzfeed)
  • Elizabeth Vail has written the best take down of the “talking to women wearing headphones” article I’ve seen yet. Enjoy this guide to talking to women reading romance novels. (Heroes and Heartbreakers)

This week on the bookish internet

  • James Wallace Harris proposes his ideal ultimate book review site. (Book Riot)
  • Ursula Le Guin will now be published in the Library of America series. (The New York Times)
  • Shara Lee has some seriously good advice for tackling your first doorstopper of a Russian novel. (Book Riot)
  • It shouldn’t be, but it’s always a delightful surprise when I learn about highly specific, book-related words. James Harbeck explains the cumdach. (Sesquiotica)

This week on the bookish internet

  • People think of librarians as quiet, reclusive people, but we weren’t always. Lauren Young shares the shenanigans as the Library of Alexandria and the Library of Pergamum fought for books and scholarship. (Atlas Obscura)
  • After a lot of suggestions about persistence, one of the most frequently offered pieces of advice writers receive is not to read their reviews. Curtis Sittenfeld reads reviews of her books anyway. Jennifer Senior asked Sittenfeld about her experience. (The New York Times)
  • Tiffani Willis explains how Charlie Brown got her to read the Russian greats. (Book Riot)
  • If the Rabid and Sad Puppies want to win book awards, they should champion better books. Damien Walter read some of the books on the Puppies’ slate and found them absolutely dreadful. (The Guardian)
  • Cameron Hunt McNabb reflects on the history and many meanings of the now-indispensable ellipsis. (Slate)
  • Sarah Gailey calls for science fiction and fantasy authors to stop using sexual violence as a genre trope. (Tor)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Michele Filgate and authors, librarians, and other bookish folk share their stories of getting caught with limited or no reading material. The horror! (LitHub)
  • Djuna Barnes’s Nightwood (1936) may feature the first trans character in fiction. (The Awl)
  • Stuart Nadler wonders what happens to all the characters he created who didn’t make it to the final version of the story. (LitHub)
  • Beth Fish confesses her “bad” bookish habits. (Beth Fish Reads)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Hong Kong’s censorship saga has a new chapter. This week’s Hong Kong Book Fair ended with the government seizure of over 1,000 books. (Moby Lives)
  • We live in a fallen age of book reviewing. According to J.H. Pearl, “For one review, in 1760, Smollett was convicted of seditious libel, fined £100, and sentence to three months in prison.” (The Millions)
  • Claire Cock-Starkey lets us know where to see 10 of the oldest books in the world. (mental floss)
  • Nell Beram has important advice for learning to read and walk at the same time. (The Awl)
  • Lori Jakiela shares her memories of her worst book-signing ever. (LitHub)
    • Pair with: Peter Damien explaining why he doesn’t talk to authors at signing events. (Book Riot)
  • This week in warm, bookish fuzzies: a California writer sent out a call for help after a decade of budget cuts ruined a school library. People from around the world have already sent in more than 15,000 books. (ABC 10)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Gabrielle Bellot eloquently explains why Calvin & Hobbes is great literature. (LitHub)
  • Kelly Gallucci has gone so far away from book spoilers that she barely reads reviews before diving into a novel. I still don’t know how she does it. (Bookish)
  • There’s a battle between book street vendors, the New York Police Department, and the neighborhood between 72nd and 74th Street at Broadway. (DNAInfo)
  • Rebecca Foster created a delightful a list of bookish ways to procrastinate. (Bookish Beck)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Nick Ripatrazone reflects on authors who burned their work or asked for their work to be burned after their deaths. (The Millions)
    • Pair this with a short article about 10 authors who asked friends and family to destroy their work. (mental floss)
  • Carly Miller has a wonderful rant about the meaning of all these books that call women girls in their titles. (Melville House Press blog)
  • An academic study has mapped out “book deserts,” places in the United States were children have scant (if any) access to books. (NYU At a Glance)