This week on the bookish internet

  • Dana Lee shares her bookish habits/rituals. I wish I was more interesting reader having read the list. I just plunk myself on the coach, wait to get covered in cats (3 seconds, tops), and read until I need to get up to go to the bathroom. (Book Riot)
  • Jo Lou asked a bunch of book designers about covers they rejected and the ones they accepted. (Electric Literature)
  • Callie Ryan Brimberry has a terrific example of the power of a book to connect strangers. (Book Riot)
  • I’ve always had a soft spot in my heart for the grawlix. (Words at Play)
  • Kristin Arnett shares what happens when librarians go DIY. (LitHub)
  • Laura Sackton reflects on what her favorite books share. (Book Riot)
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This week on the bookish internet

  • Erin Barnett asked other librarians about whether or not we lend books to people. It turns out that we’re surprisingly stingy most of the time—or maybe not so surprising in light of the fact that we know what people to do books they borrow. (Electric Literature)
  • James Jeffrey reports on the custody battle for hundreds of Ethiopian religious manuscripts that were looted by British soldiers in 1868. (Atlas Obscura)
  • Stuart Kells shares the story of how Aboriginal oral literatures were studied and misrepresented (and misunderstood) by Westerners. This sentence might sound a little dry, but it’s fascinating. If nothing else, I learned that Bruce Chatwin was kind of an asshole. (LitHub)
  • Kasia van Schaik reflects on what it means to be a single woman who reads. (Electric Literature)
  • Yep, people are still asking for books to be banned at their local libraries. (The Guardian)
  • Christine Hauser reports on what happened after teenagers were sentenced to books after committing race-related vandalism. (New York Times)

This week on the bookish internet

This week on the bookish internet

 

 

This week on the bookish internet

This week on the bookish internet

This week on the bookish internet

  • So it turns out there’s a centuries’ long history of hating poetry. (The Baffler)
  • The LitHub staff list the fictional houses they would like to live in/visit. I disagree with most of it. I read some of House of Leaves and I don’t even like being in the same room as a copy of the book; there’s no way in hell I would want to stay in that house.
  • Give Mary Wollstonecraft a statue! (The Guardian)
  • Christine Prevas tells a delightful story about how Shakespeare didn’t work at first in wooing her crush, but it did the second time. (Electric Lit)
  • I find this story about conservatives bewailing the fact that students sympathize with Frankenstein’s monster hilarious. (Gizmodo)
  • Should authors rate their own books? Nope! (Book Riot)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Alberto Manguel, bibliophile extraordinaire, writes about the joy of dictionaries. (Chronicle of Higher Education)
  • Charlotte Bailey profiles five amazing libraries that are open in dire circumstances. (The Guardian)
  • When I visit someone’s house or see their shelfies online, I, like Jen Sherman does this piece, absolutely look at people’s books. (Book Riot)
  • Ian Dreiblatt has written a highly entertaining history of people attacking each other over literature. (Moby Lives)
  • This isn’t a specific post, but I wanted to point out this great series from LitHub in which they interview book critics/reviewers. The interviewer always asks the same questions, which can reveal some interesting things about how the interviewee sees literature and their role in the bookish world.

This week on the bookish internet

This week on the bookish internet

  • Auður Ava Ólafsdóttir writes about why literature is a threat to the intolerant. (LitHub)
    • Chaser: A delightful post by William Savage about Samuel Johnson and Jeremy Bentham’s cats, among other feline companions from the eighteenth century. (Pen and Pension)
  • These Citizen Science projects are perfect for us bookish types. (Book Riot)
  • Katy Waldman wrote a fascinating article about reading Ovid at a time when sexual harassment is everywhere in the media. (The New Yorker)
  • Sara Wood describes creating the cover for The House of Impossible Beauties. (LitHub)
  • If literature’s famous men were on Tindr. (McSweeney’s)
  • I love this post about being a bookish child by Lucy Mangan, if only for paragraphs like this:
    • “But for children, rereading is absolutely necessary. The act of reading is itself still new. A lot of energy is still going into (not so) simple decoding of words and the assimilation of meaning. Only then do you get to enjoy the plot – to begin to get lost in the story. The beauty of a book is that it remains the same for as long as you need it. You can’t wear out a book’s patience.

      “There is hope for a man who has never read Malory or Boswell or Tristram Shandy or Shakespeare’s sonnets,” CS Lewis once wrote. “But what can you do with a man who says he ‘has read’ them, meaning he has read them once and thinks that this settles the matter?” The more you read, the more locks and keys you have. Rereading keeps you oiled and working smoothly, the better to let you access yourself and others for the rest of your life.” (The Guardian)