This week on the bookish internet

  • Auður Ava Ólafsdóttir writes about why literature is a threat to the intolerant. (LitHub)
    • Chaser: A delightful post by William Savage about Samuel Johnson and Jeremy Bentham’s cats, among other feline companions from the eighteenth century. (Pen and Pension)
  • These Citizen Science projects are perfect for us bookish types. (Book Riot)
  • Katy Waldman wrote a fascinating article about reading Ovid at a time when sexual harassment is everywhere in the media. (The New Yorker)
  • Sara Wood describes creating the cover for The House of Impossible Beauties. (LitHub)
  • If literature’s famous men were on Tindr. (McSweeney’s)
  • I love this post about being a bookish child by Lucy Mangan, if only for paragraphs like this:
    • “But for children, rereading is absolutely necessary. The act of reading is itself still new. A lot of energy is still going into (not so) simple decoding of words and the assimilation of meaning. Only then do you get to enjoy the plot – to begin to get lost in the story. The beauty of a book is that it remains the same for as long as you need it. You can’t wear out a book’s patience.

      “There is hope for a man who has never read Malory or Boswell or Tristram Shandy or Shakespeare’s sonnets,” CS Lewis once wrote. “But what can you do with a man who says he ‘has read’ them, meaning he has read them once and thinks that this settles the matter?” The more you read, the more locks and keys you have. Rereading keeps you oiled and working smoothly, the better to let you access yourself and others for the rest of your life.” (The Guardian)

 

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This week on the bookish internet

This week on the bookish internet

This week on the bookish internet

This week on the bookish internet

  • We recently asked our students why they came to the library. More than one said something to the effect of cruising for chicks. It turns out there’s a history of this kind of behavior. (Daily JSTOR)
  • Steph Auteri shares her rules for tackling her mountain of a to-read pile. (Book Riot)
  • Library cataloging standards might not be the perfect way to organize information, but they’re a hell of lot better than a system based on scent. (Weird Universe)
  • Erin Coulehan explains why prisoners shouldn’t have their reading choices curtailed. (Los Angeles Review of Books Blog)
  • Teresa Preston ponders the peculiar pleasure of hate-reading. (Book Riot)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Christine Ro takes on the bookish annoyance of the week—shelving books backward for aesthetic reasons—and comes up with some intriguing defenses. I’m never going to do this; I know it would drive me insane. (Book Riot)
  • Rebecca Foster has tips for fixing up used books in your collection. (Bookish Beck)
  • How Tajja Isen learned to DNF books. I mostly like this post because of the following quote:
    • “Purchased on a true-crime high after I read Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood, Mailer’s 1100-page epic didn’t just show me the value of abandoning a book. It gave me the satisfaction of getting your money back once you return it to the bookstore (true story, and the only time that’s ever happened to me).” (Book Riot)
  • Dhonielle Clayton is a sensitivity reader. (Vulture)
  • I love reading stories about science being used to “read” ancient books that are so damaged they can’t be opened. (The New York Times)

This fortnight on the bookish internet

This week on the bookish internet

  • WALES HAS A SKELETON CHRISTMAS HORSE THAT MUST BE ADDRESSED WITH POETRY(LitHub)
  • Jane Austen’s readers hilariously come to her defense when someone said something stupid about her on Twitter. (The AV Club)
  • It’s the season of hope and, to inspire the writers among you, Emily Temple has classic books and best-sellers that were rejected dozens of times before they were published. (LitHub)
  • After nearly 2,000 years, Rome’s city council has pardoned Ovid for whatever it was he did to get himself exiled by Augustus Caesar. (Moby Lives)
  • Kiran Manral writes about her battle against publishers who want her to stick to one genre. (Scroll.in)
  • Lorraine Berry writes about the appeal of lost books. (Signature)

This week on the bookish internet

  • I know not everyone enjoys reading savage book reviews. But I do. So I’m glad that this round up of the best book burns of the year exists. (LitHub)
  • Nikki Griffiths shares yet more evidence that the picks for Nobel Prize for Literature is arbitrary. (Moby Lives)
  • If it hadn’t been for Edward Garnett, we might not have known the works of Joseph Conrad. (LitHub)
  • S. Mitra Kalita talks about the books that got her through this very difficult, frustrating year. (CNN)
  • I daresay that the fact that a male author declares that women are the best writers today means that the argument will be taken more seriously than if a female author had said it. (The Guardian)
  • Annie Spence takes us behind the scenes of work as a part-time public librarian to show how much they do—and how perilous their position is in an era of callous austerity. (LitHub)

This week on the bookish internet

  • I wasn’t the only person thinking about translation this week. Tim Parks has a report on an event that delights me right to my bookish, word nerd core: competitive translation. (The New York Review of Books)
  • Laura Sackton makes me want to revise my reading spreadsheet. (Book Riot)
  • Sarah Seltzer points out what happens when successful women writers are targeted for scandal. (Jezebel)
  • Some predictions on what next year’s book covers will look like. (The Digital Reader)
  • This one is for my library and academic readers out there: Daniela Blei writes in praise of taxonomy. (The Atlantic)
  • Jennifer Gonzalez argues that we need to change how reading is taught so that it doesn’t kill the joy of reading. (The Cult of Pedagogy)