This week on the bookish internet

  • Maegan Donovan argues for giving another chance to books we hated. (Book Riot)
  • Pamela Paul and Maria Russo have some advice for helping your kids become readers. (The New York Times)
  • Charles Halton introduces readers to the world’s earliest known poet: Enheduanna. (LitHub)
  • Glenn Fleishmann reports that letterpress printing is having a revival. (Wired)
  • Librarian Carolyn Johnson collects thousands of books to give away to children who can’t afford them. I love this so much. (Moby Lives)
  • Emily Temple rounded up a list of ten book hoarders. Temple defines a book hoarder as someone who owns more than 1,000 books—so I just miss out with about 800 books to my name. (LitHub)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Kelsey Kennedy writes about a stunning 9,000 item collection of pop-up books. (Atlas Obscura)
  • Cher Tan reflects on how reading has shaped her life and psyche and vice versa. I can’t get enough of readers talking about how reading made them who they are. (The Catapult)
    • Pair this essay with Michael Sullivan’s delightful recounting of his reading life, which is entwined with his wife’s. (LitHub)
  • Canadian justices and lawyers put Lord and Lady Macbeth on trial during the Stratford Festival. (CBC Radio)
  • Samantha Haskell came up with a novel (heh) idea to help save the bookstore she’d inherited: community supported bookselling. (The New Yorker)
  • Caveat lector! David Gaughran explains Amazon’s fake book problem. (Let’s Get Digital)
  • Ian Dreiblatt has some hilariously surreal recipes for eating the great works of literature. (Moby Lives)

 

This fortnight on the bookish internet

After having the family descend upon me for a reunion last weekend, I’m finally getting on top of this blog again. (Love you, guys!)

  • Mark O’Connell wittily ponders why some readers choose to put themselves through the monumental task of reading very long books. (The Millions)
  • Matt Grant writes about a topic near and dear to my heart: worrying about making book recommendations. (Book Riot)
  • Thomas Keneally, Rivka Galchen, and Anna Holmes recently took on the question of cultural appropriation in fiction. (The GuardianThe New York Times)
  • Saskia Lacey takes a stab at listing 50 recent novels that might become classics. Naturally, I disagree with quite a bit of it. (B&N Reads)
  • Daniel Jose Ruiz reminisces about his love for Brian Jacques’ Redwall series. (Los Angeles Review of Books)
  • Danuta Kean reports on PEN International’s efforts to help writers who’ve been displaced, censored, or persecuted. (The Guardian)
  • John Gibbs reveals that stocking a bookstore can be an existential and frustrating experience. (LitHub)
  • Kristen Twardowski has tips for reading while walking. (Book Riot)
  • James Reith relates the strange practices of Tunglið, an Icelandic press that has turned publishing into performance art. (The Guardian)

This week on the bookish internet

This week on the bookish internet

  • Rebecca Hussey reflects on her changing attitude toward dark books. (Book Riot)
  • More fragments of books printed by William Caxton have been found. (Moby Lives)
  • Melissa Baron found the book she needed because another reader left it behind. (Book Riot)
  • Victoria Jaggard reports on newly recovered text from charred scrolls found at Herculaneum. (Smithsonian Magazine)
  • Many readers would argue that she has too many books on her to-read list, but Danika Ellis defends her list. (Book Riot)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Stacie Williams (rightly) throws library neutrality out the window. (LitHub)
  • Matt Grant reflects on his antipathy for well-loved books. (Book Riot)
  • I always get a kick out of reading rules and regs from medieval libraries. Personally, I wish we could chain our copies of the DSM-V to the shelves because they wander. (Medievalists.net)
    • Pair with this short piece about the need for marginalia. (Farnam Street)
  • Viet Thanh Nguyen lists great Vietnam War novels by Vietnamese authors. (New York Times)
  • Abbey Fenbert recalls her complicated relationship with books and puberty. (Catapult)
  • Steve Attardo talks about designing book jackets. (LitHub)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Sian Cain rounds up author cameos in films based on their books. (The Guardian)
  • Danika Ellis explains what happened when she read for 24 hours straight for Dewey’s Readathon. (Book Riot)
  • Kristen Twardowski offers some ways we can help fund libraries—apart from calling our Congress critters and asking them to save the IMLS or participating in EveryLibrary. (Book Riot)
  • Kristina Pino says we need more words for bookish emotions. I agree. (Book Riot)
  • Danuta Kean explains why she always reads the end of the book first. (The Guardian)
  • Pamela Paul has more bookish advice: read books you’ll hate. (The New York Times)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Maddie Rodriguez hypothesizes about what makes a great plot twist. (Book Riot)
  • Scott Esposito writes about the importance of writers who keep the tragedies of recent decades in our thoughts. (LitHub)
  • Deepali Agarwal explains why we need to take writers seriously when they tell us about sexism and racism in publishing. (Book Riot)
  • One more reason to love libraries: Lynchburg Public Library is feeding hungry kids. (WSET)
  • Doree Shafrir reflects on why book clubs don’t work for her. (Buzzfeed)
  • Rebecca Donnelly tweeted 17 things you can do for your public library. (Republished on Book Riot)
  • Nikki Griffiths writes about the efforts to rebuilt the Mosul Central Library. (Moby Lives)

This fortnight on the bookish internet

  • The folks at LitHub have rounded up some of the Library of Congress’ treasures for a special National Library Week post.
  • Peter Clark reports on how Syrian refugees are taking time to save books. (Moby Lives)
  • Adam Cozary makes delightfully zany GIFs with medieval illuminations. (TechCrunch)
  • Chloe Farand writes about the last librarian of Mosul. (The Independent)
  • Romeo Rosales writes about one of the American Library Association’s more adventurous moments: when they went to war. (Book Riot)
  • Matt Grant discusses the vexed question of supporting independent bookstores. (Book Riot)
  • A time capsule linked to Jules Verne has been found in southern France. (Digital Reader)
  • Like all readers, John Sherman understands that shelving books involves a lot more than the alphabet. (LitHub)
  • Reader Marianne has some advice for coping with your problematic favorites. (Boricuan Bookworms)

This fortnight on the bookish internet

  • You shouldn’t burn books for so many reasons, but here’s another reason if you needed it: you might accidentally burn your house down. (CNN: Be warned that a video plays on page load.)
  • Barbara Dee was told not to talk about her book at an author talk to sixth graders for fear of parental backlash. (Nerdy Book Club)
  • I’ve just added another place to my bucket list: the doomsday library in Svalbard. (Huffington Post)
  • This 400-year-old book is made of feathers! (Atlas Obscura)
  • Matthew Kirschenbaum takes a deep dive into the dark, bewildering world of illegal book downloads. (Public Books)
  • Elizabeth Allen explains the five stages of having overdue library books. With GIFs. (Book Riot)
  • Hannah Smothers writes about yet another book removed from the curriculum because of parental complaints. The target this time is a sweet book about a boy who wears a dress. (Cosmopolitan)
  • Emily Temple does sterling work rounding up the weird and amazing origins of classics. (LitHub)