bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • Joycita Rose Malrey Lucas is a bookish hero for asking Scholastic to send copies of a book to her classmates, who couldn’t always afford books. (Moby Lives)
  • The Atlas of Endangered Alphabets is fascinating and sad at the same time. (Open Culture)
  • Marie Myong-Ok Lee has thoughts about how autism is portrayed and used in fiction. (New York Times)
  • Reddit readers have advice for reading more. The usual advice is there, but also some new tips. (Lifehacker)
  • Emily MacGuire reminds readers that even if we’re not classically “well read,” we can be differently well read. (The Guardian)
  • Part of the joy of reading Dickens is the incredible (in both senses of the word) names in the novels. (Biblioklept)
  • Nick Rapitrazone writes in praise of line editors. (LitHub)
  • Keira Drake and Jonah Winter describe their experiences with the vicious call out culture online that led to their book cancelations or failures. (New York Times)

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bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • Tobias Carroll wonders about the possible risks of writing about extremists in fiction. (LitHub)
  • Amir-Hussein Radjy writes in praise of Iranian poet Forough Farrokhzad. (New York Times)
  • J.D. Salinger kept writing but stopped publishing. Matt Salinger shares a few glimpses on his father’s unpublished work. (The Guardian)
  • What is it like for women of color in publishing? (Bustle)
  • Librarians share what may be the oldest known manuscript to mention Merlin. (BBC)
  • Geraldine Fabrikant profiles Bauman’s Rare Books…with plenty of pictures of rare titles to drool over. (New York Times)
  • Juliet Lapidos did not enjoy being pressured by Hollywood about the adaptability of her novel. (The New Yorker)
  • I adore articles about food in literature, so Christine Ro’s post about memorable fictional meals is pure catnip. (Book Riot)
bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • Valerie Stivers creates a classic Russian menu to enjoy alongside the bonkers books of the Strugatsky Brothers. (The Paris Review)
  • Publishing is still very, very white. (LA Review of Books)
  • This take on how many books one ought to have is funnier than my response to Marie Kondo v. bibliophiles. (Librarian Shipwreck)
  • Book nooks in Pune, India! (Hindustan Times)
  • A scientist quibbles with Jonathan Swift. (Ars Technica)
  • Lucian Kim describes the revival of Moscow’s libraries. (NPR)
  • Jonathan Freeland writes in praise of Amos Oz. (New York Review of Books)
  • Charlie Jane Anders argues that more science fiction authors should be writing about climate change. Maybe if we can understand the consequences of dramatic climate change, we can do something about it; it’s not the first time science fiction has inspired reality. (Tor)
bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • Can you tell the difference between Edgar Allan Poe’s words and emo lyrics? (mental floss)
  • The Library of Burnt Books is an incredibly moving project. (BBC)
  • Carrie V. Mullins tackles the question of why authors aren’t making as much money as they used to. (Electric Literature)
  • Medievalist Sarah Durn explains what you need to know if you’re going to watch the adaptation of A Discovery of Witches. (io9)
  • Stop moving LGBTQ children’s books away from the readers who need them! (The Guardian)Andrew Simmons has complicated thoughts about To Kill a Mockingbird and just how useful it really is. (The Millions)
bookish links

This week on the bookish internet


I was going to post a round of responses to Marie Kondo and book collections, but I needed to declutter my Instapaper folder and they weren’t sparking joy…

*rimshot*

bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • Jen Sherman creates her perfect book nook at IKEA…which makes me wonder what we bookish folk might do if we had an infinite budget to make a book nook? (Book Riot)
  • Lois Becket had a job I would relish: to spend 12 days off the internet, reading a stack of books. (The Guardian)
  • Oliver Tearle writes in praise of Saki. (Interesting Literature)
  • Alison Flood reports that London’s Feminist Library has been saved! (The Guardian)
  • This poem by Dutch writer, Gerard Nolst Trenité, shows just how tricky English is. (Open Culture)
  • Would you like to hear J.R.R. Tolkien read from The Fellowship of the Ring? (Brain Pickings)
  • Cecil Court is now on my bookish bucket list. (Atlas Obscura)
  • The Guardian‘s Book Clinic is still going strong, if you need a dose of bibliotherapy.
bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • Is one of your New Year’s resolutions to track your reading? Rachel Manwill has the mother of all book tracking spreadsheets for you. (Book Riot)
  • Emmanuel Nataf rounded up Christmas cartoons from Calvin and Hobbes. (LitReactor)
  • Jessica Stillman writes about the curious idea of an “anti-library.” (Fast Company)
  • Gary Yonge only read African women for a year. (The Guardian)
  • I’m glad I’m not the only one with thoughts about top book lists. Maris Kreizman’s thoughts are a lot more creative than mine, though. (Dame)
  • Alison Flood writes about an author with the strange task of writing stories to put readers to sleep. (The Guardian)
  • Abby Hargreaves answers our Google autocomplete questions about libraries. (Book Riot)

I will be traveling for the holidays and won’t be able to post regularly until I get back to the book cave. Happy holidays, everyone!