This week on the bookish internet

This week on the bookish internet

This week on the bookish internet

  • Tiffani Willis has reading rituals. (Book Riot)
  • I can never get enough of articles about recovered ancient and medieval texts, like this one involving sixth century writing in a book from 1537 held at Northwestern University. (mental_floss)
  • Nick Mafi rounds up some of the most beautiful university libraries in the world—including some I haven’t seen before. (Architectural Digest)
  • Laura Sackton writes against star-ratings for books. (Book Riot)
  • Read about the bookish life of Carla Hayden, first African American, first woman, and first actual librarian to be Librarian of Congress. (The New York Times)
  • Anna Solomon reflects on women on book covers and what it means when the woman on the cover is not looking wistfully away from the viewer or doesn’t have a head at all. (The Millions)
  • Dystopias are more obviously products of our time, but Danuta Kean writes about the recently emergence of books about empathy and kindness as an antidote for what ails our societies. (The Guardian)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Tara Cheesman has a pragmatic take on novels-in-translation. (Book Riot)
  • One of my guilty pleasures is reading bad book reviews by good book reviewers (especially when I agree with them and/or they’re taking down an author I think its pretentious and overhyped). So imagine my delight when Anna Silman rounded up a bunch of Michiko Kakutani’s best bad reviews. (The Cut)
  • Nikki Griffith’s briefly shares booksellers’ stories of sticky-fingered customers. (Moby Lives)
    • Pair with Alison Flood and Sian Cain’s longer article on book thievery. (The Guardian)
  • Texting and the internet are doing really interesting things to Arabic (classical and dialect), according to Hodna Nuernberg. (Asymptote Journal)
  • Emily Temple offers and interesting new way of understanding A Midsummer Night’s Dream: by giving it a playlist. (LitHub)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Librarians at Denver Public will recommend you a book based on your tattoos. Warning: video autoplays. (9News)
  • Marah Gubar explains how it’s not enough to read diverse books and empathize. Books like The Hate U Give should also be a call to action. (Public Books)
  • Rachel Dunphy writes in praise of Mrs. Bennett. (LitHub)
  • If you can’t get enough of Jane Austen, Rebecca Hussey would like to recommend a few of her contemporaries. (Book Riot)
  • Robert Fernandez writes a scathing response to a Philadelphia man who objected to LGBTQ-friendly policies at the Philadelphia Free Library. (Intellectual Freedom Blog)
  • Jamie Canaves and Gail Carriger have thoughts about the importance of noms de plume and “reader betrayal.” (Book RiotJanice Hardy’s Fiction University)
  • When Tsarist Russia banned books written in Lithuanian in Latin letters, the knygnešiai started smuggling books into the country by the thousands. (Atlas Obscura)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Alexander Dickow writers about the extra challenges of translating science fiction. (Asymptote Journal)
  • A sure sign of readers’ love of a book is that librarians and teachers can’t keep it on the shelves because it keeps getting stolen. (Book Riot)
  • Natasha Pulley argues that fantasy has a place in historical fiction. (Waterstones)
  • S.W. Sondheimer has some serious questions about what to do when you read a book in a series you love and it just isn’t that good. (Book Riot)
  • Fans of Book Riot created some brilliant book spine poetry for #RiotGrams.
  • Angie Miller “confesses” that she does everything wrong as a school librarian, but all I see is a kind librarian helping her readers. (Knowledge Quest)
  • Susan Harlan contemplates the meaning of book stacks versus bookshelves, organization schemes, and why people get so uptight about other people’s libraries. (LitHub)

This week on the bookish internet

  • I’ve seen calls for help transcribing old documents before, but this one is probably the best project ever. The Newberry Library in Chicago needs help transcribing books about witchcraft and sorcery. (Chicagoist)
  • There is a prize for oddest book title and the early nominees for 2017 are in! (The Guardian)
  • This recent law passed in Florida—which allows any resident to ask for school science and library materials to be removed—hurts my heart. (BoingBoing)
  • “Professional Reader” Angela has some sage advice for dealing with book slumps. (That’s Normal)
  • I completely understand Adiba Jaigirdar’s failed attempts at book clubbing as an English major. (Book Riot)
  • While this post is ostensibly about what the author delightfully dubs arranged book marriages, a lot of this post is about how parents can kill their children’s love of reading. (The Loudest Librarian)
  • Staff from LitHub polled 50 writers from 30 countries about which titles were “quintessential American fiction.”

This week on the bookish internet

  • Mike Lindgren reports on a library that escaped the being cut by British local governments in this touching piece. (The Millions)
  • Meanwhile, the Tucson School District is actively enforcing a state law that prohibits books that “advocate ethnic solidarity.” Books by Hispanic Americans, African Americans, and Asian Americans are on the chopping block. (Moby Lives)
  • Indian scientists put adults into an fMRI as they learned how to read to see what happens when the brain learns how to turn squiggles into meaning. (mental_floss)
  • Tiffani Willis thinks everyone should keep a book journal. (Book Riot)
  • Australia’s Avid Reader has a long history of taking on trolls who come for their authors and books. (The Guardian)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Maegan Donovan argues for giving another chance to books we hated. (Book Riot)
  • Pamela Paul and Maria Russo have some advice for helping your kids become readers. (The New York Times)
  • Charles Halton introduces readers to the world’s earliest known poet: Enheduanna. (LitHub)
  • Glenn Fleishmann reports that letterpress printing is having a revival. (Wired)
  • Librarian Carolyn Johnson collects thousands of books to give away to children who can’t afford them. I love this so much. (Moby Lives)
  • Emily Temple rounded up a list of ten book hoarders. Temple defines a book hoarder as someone who owns more than 1,000 books—so I just miss out with about 800 books to my name. (LitHub)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Kelsey Kennedy writes about a stunning 9,000 item collection of pop-up books. (Atlas Obscura)
  • Cher Tan reflects on how reading has shaped her life and psyche and vice versa. I can’t get enough of readers talking about how reading made them who they are. (The Catapult)
    • Pair this essay with Michael Sullivan’s delightful recounting of his reading life, which is entwined with his wife’s. (LitHub)
  • Canadian justices and lawyers put Lord and Lady Macbeth on trial during the Stratford Festival. (CBC Radio)
  • Samantha Haskell came up with a novel (heh) idea to help save the bookstore she’d inherited: community supported bookselling. (The New Yorker)
  • Caveat lector! David Gaughran explains Amazon’s fake book problem. (Let’s Get Digital)
  • Ian Dreiblatt has some hilariously surreal recipes for eating the great works of literature. (Moby Lives)