bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

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bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • Jessica Leigh Hester reports on the librarians who answer impossible questions about the books we can’t quite remember. (Atlas Obscura)
  • Ayşegül Savaş shares her writerly experiences as a story-collector. (LitHub)
  • Livia Gershon writes about the mental dangers of being a librarian in the Victorian era. (Judging by the #librarylife stories, some patrons still seem to be trying to drive librarians ’round the bend.) (Daily JSTOR)
  • Rena Olsen argues in favor of well-rounded villains that you could find yourself rooting for. (Signature)
  • Readers have heard this before, but it’s always nice to be reminded that reading stories has been scientifically demonstrated to help us develop empathy for others. (LitHub)
bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

I’ve been traveling the last couple of weeks and my work schedule was all kinds of crazy this past week. I expect to be back on my regular posting schedule as of this weekend. Just letting you know so that you didn’t think I was losing steam. 

  • Geir Gulliksen explains autofiction. (Read It Forward)
  • Sonja Palmer has a set of rebuttals all ready for you the next time someone says something stupid to you about the bookish world. (Book Riot)
  • Kristen McDeavitt loves it when readers inscribe books to each other. (Book Riot)
  • Ace Ratcliff has important thoughts about disability in science fiction. (i09)
  • Rebecca Foster has some highly practical advice for culling books, including what do with them after you’ve decided to say good-bye. (Bookish Beck)
  • Claire Cock-Starkey profiles six very naughty and very prohibited library collections. (Lapham’s Quarterly)
bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • Peggy Dean shows us that, if one is a very good writer, one can toss out all the rules about how to write good sentences right out the window. (Read It Forward)
  • Emma Court writes about the pleasures of rereading childhood favorites and why we keep going back to the well. (The Atlantic)
  • Charlotte Ahlin has tips for diving into a new genre. (Bustle)
  • For pete’s sake, an LGBT+ book display and accompanying buttons are not controversial. (Salt Lake Tribune)
  • Arriel Vinson discusses how AAVE is treated like a roadblock to accessibility—and how writers of color are always asked to consider white readers. (Electric Literature)
  • Hong Kong’s Obscene Articles Tribunal has probably given Haruki Murakami the best advertising ever: by declaring that his latest book is indecent. (The Guardian)
bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • The latest development in the alternate Nobel for Literature: readers get to vote! (Book Riot)
  • 2,000 Libros is soliciting donations to send books to children who have been forcibly separated from their parents and incarcerated by the American government. (2,000 Libros)
  • I have never heard of fairy tale writer Mary de Morgan, but I desperately want to read her stories now. (Folklore Thursday)
  • Designers share their process for creating the covers for 10 books. (Electric Literature)
  • There’s a challenge working its way through the bookish internet: if you could only have 100 books in your library, which one would you pick? (A Life in Books)
  • Kamishibai sounds utterly charming. (The Conversation)
  • Marcos Santiago Gonsalez has a brilliant piece about teaching writing, code-switching, and what they mean for young writers. (Electric Literature)
  • Do you need more poetry in your life, but don’t know where to start? Author Rabih Alameddine posts a poem every day (or more) from a wide range of poets. (The Art Divas)
bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • Melissa Ragsdale has created some long-needed etiquette for how to loan books to friends and then get them back. (Bustle)
  • Jamie Rigg reports on an early reading device that could compress Innocents Abroad onto just 13 tiny cards with even tinier print for a reader that looks guaranteed to make you go blind. (Engadget)
  • TMN has a brilliant write up of post-World War I literature, inspired by a trip to a special exhibit at the Tate Modern. If this is your jam, this post has tons of recommendations. (The Modern Novel)
  • Keri Blakinger writes about lawyer Amalia Beckner‘s quest to bring books to prisoners and the ongoing battles over arbitrary prison banned books lists. (Houston Chronicle)
  • Diane Mehta discusses women in the rare books trade and the value of women’s words. (The Paris Review)
  • Librarians held storytime at one of the end family separation protests last Saturday and I’m not crying, you’re crying. (School Library Journal)
  • There are plans to award an alternate Nobel Award for Literature and I more excited than I am for the actual (now delayed) award. (The Guardian)