This week on the bookish internet

  • Sarah Gailey shares what they learned from a sensitivity reader and how it changed their life. (The Book Smugglers)
  • Translators pick their favorite untranslatable words. (mentalfloss)
  • Lorraine Boissoneault explores why we are so fascinated by historical what ifs in this short history of alternate history. (Smithsonian Magazine)
  • Mary Robinette Kowal writes about her realization that authors have a unique responsibility to their readers: writing stories that won’t be internalized in ways reinforce harmful stereotypes or erase diversity. (Tor)
  • Stephanie Vozza writes about what happened when she attempted to kick her reading into overdrive (just my little bookish joke, heh) and try to read 30 books in 30 days. (Fast Company)
  • Emily Temple has a list of 40 great villains from literature. (LitHub)
Advertisements

This week on the bookish internet

  • Aminatta Forna discusses the decision authors make to write either non-fiction or fiction. (LitHub)
  • Cecilia Lyra and Katherine Marciniak write in praise of authors’ acknowledgements. (Book Riot)
  • Benjamin Samuel shares some special yoga poses for writers. (Electric Literature)
  • Erin Blakemore writes about the role American librarians played during the Cold War. (Daily JSTOR)
  • Faleena Hopkins has lost her suit to trademark the word “cocky.” (Moby Lives)
  • Don’t have time to read the classics? John Atkinson has summarized them in two panel cartoons for you. (LitHub)
  • I love literature, but I doubt that I will ever love an author’s work enough to shell out thousands for these kinds of relics. (Electric Literature)

This week on the bookish internet

  • I like Stephanie Dreyfuss’ rating system a lot more than the five start system. Much more flexibility and how can you not love a system that includes a category for “readable piffle”? (Buzzfeed)
  • Araminta Hall has chilling and intriguing thoughts about the way women are silenced in thrillers…and in public. (CrimeReads)
  • Dareen Tatour is under house arrest because she posted her poems online. (Los Angeles Review of Books)
  • Bhavya Dore reports on the Indian Novels Collective‘s efforts to translate and resurrect classic Indian texts. (Scroll.in)
  • Kory Stamper rants about people who complain that something is not a real word. (Harmless Drudgery)
  • F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald’s house is on AirBnB. (Open Culture)

This fortnight on the bookish internet

Since I was traveling last week and didn’t have time to do a regular weekly round up, so here’s a double dose of bookish internet-y-ness:

This week on the bookish internet

  • Adam Kirsch has thoughts about the other big problems with the Nobel Prize for Literature and calls them “the Politburo of literature.” (The Atlantic)
  • Rachel Deahl reports that publishers are starting to include “morality clauses” in their author contracts because of #MeToo. For fuck’s sake. (Publishers’ Weekly)
  • Feleena Hopkins has discovered the worst way to get attention for her books: trademarking the word “cocky” and threatening other authors. (Book Riot)
  • This story tickles and annoys me at the same time: Ian McEwan helped his son with an essay on one of McEwan’s novels and the teacher gave the son a C-. (Jezebel)
  • Christine Prevas argues for more non-binary human characters in fiction. (Electric Literature)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Here are two pieces that argue for literary scholars to just read more—read more women’s work, read more than just the established literary canon:
    • Viet Thanh Nguyen argues for a broader canon in this article for The Washington Post.
    • LitHub reprints a short section of Joanna Russ’ How to Suppress Women’s Writing.
  • William Savage wrote a short history of libraries in the eighteenth century. For me, this is like reading about your great-grandparents. (Pen and Pension)
  • Speaking of librarians, Chi Luu explains how the Brothers Grimm came to collect folklore and became linguists. (JSTOR Daily)
  • Even more library goodness: Fiona MacDonald reports on hidden libraries around the world. (BBC)
  • Smithereens took a trip to Alexandre Dumas’ chateau and I am very jealous.

This week on the bookish internet

  • Chris Harris offers another way to teach poetry so that kids don’t grow up hating it. (Lithub)
  • Abby Hargreaves has complicated feelings about her favorite book. (Book Riot)
  • Satire is hard. Denise Crosby reports on a recent incident in which satire collided with censorship. (Chicago Tribune)
  • Matthew H. Birkhold explores the uses and misuses of Jane Austen in court opinions. (Electric Literature)
  • One of the first things my colleague and I teach students in our advanced writing class is to mark up their texts. Nick Ripatrazone gives an eloquent explanation of the necessity of scribbling in our books. (LitHub)