bookish links

This fortnight on the bookish internet

I missed last week’s bookish update due to a monstrous cold. So this Saturday you get a double-barreled bookish internet roundup. 

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bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • Cats and bookstores go together like tea and rainy afternoons. (LitHub)
  • Andreea Scridon went to the University of East Anglia’s International Summer School for Literary Translation. (Asymptote Journal)
  • Mark Twain hated his typewriter. (Moby Lives)
  • Dr. Tiffany Watt Smith reflects on the agony and the ecstasy of schadenfreude. (LitHub)
  • This list of 27 rare English words renews my love for the language. I plan to start using #3 a lot. (Buzzfeed)
  • Alice Nuttall writes in praise of the Susan Pevensies of literature: practical characters who pack a lunch before heading off on an adventure and take sensible boots. (Book Riot)
  • Kristen Arnett is thankful for how being a librarian has helped her become more virtuous. (LitHub)
  • I like Laura Frey’s rules for readers a lot more than Jonathan Franzen’s rules for writers. (Reading in Bed)

bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • James Geary writes in praise of puns, with a review of great puns of the past. (The Paris Review)
  • Samantha Harvey explores something I love in literature: writing a story backwards. (LitHub
    • Time’s Arrow really is a great read, even though it’s incredibly unsettling. 
  • Librarians have sorting competitions because of course we do. (Electric Literature)
  • If you buy a Russian book now, there’s a chance any queer or LGBT+ themes have been scrubbed out. (Moby Lives)
  • All about the fascinating practice of letter locking. (Open Culture)
  • Struggling with reader’s block? Emily Petsko has some ideas for you. (mental_floss)
  • Nara Monteiro has some serious thoughts about how J.K. Rowling’s wizarding world is incorporating the history of the Holocaust into the Fantastic Beasts series. (The Walrus)

bookish links

This week on the bookish type

  • Josephine Livingstone reports on an amazing exhibit of Old English texts and other rare, ancient books currently on display at the British Library. I am so jealous. (The New Republic)
  • Julie Dobrow reveals what happened to Emily Dickinson’s poems after her death. It appears there was a whole lot of editing. (LitHub)
  • What does it mean when a historical novel based on a true story is published with mistakes? (The New York Times)
  • Students at Oxford University no longer need a teacher’s note to look at “naughty” books at the Bodleian. (CNN)
  • Peter Derk categorizes all the ways an author’s unfinished works have been dealt with after their death. (LitReactor)
  • Eleanor Tremeer argues that we need utopian fiction now. (io9)
  • William Atkins follows in the steps of Charles Dickens and Pip on the Hoo Peninsula. (New York Times)
  • Medieval book carousels! (medievalbooks)
bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • There’s an actual prize for weirdest book title and it’s time to vote! (The Bookseller)
  • Books are Cecilia Lyra’s love language. (Book Riot)
  • It’s November, so this post pairing pie with books is just what I needed. (Read it Forward)
  • Richard Lea shares the multicultural origins of The Thousand and One Nights. (The Guardian)
  • Viv Groskop reveals just how odd some of the greats of Russian literature were. (LitHub)
  • So you’re reading more diversely, now what? Simone Jung has next steps. (Book Riot)
bookish links

This week on the bookish type

  • Jonathan Taylor shares details about one of the world’s oldest libraries, belonging to King Ashurbanipal, currently on display at the British Museum. (British Museum Blog)
  • Paul Alexander shares the remarkable story of how 14 letters from Sylvia Plath to her psychiatrist, perhaps the only remaining documents from the years before her death, came to be included in a recently published volume of Plath’s letters. (LitHub)
  • Julie Sedivy wrote a fascinating essay about what it might mean that centuries old (medieval and ancient) literature does not contain complex emotional language, the effects of reading more subtle literature on our ability to understand emotions, and psychological research about what happens in readers’ brains. (Nautilus)
  • Parul Seghal explores the meanings of ghosts in American literature, past and mostly present.  (New York Times)
bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • Michael Seidlinger explores the more radical possibilities of book groups. (Moby Lives)
  • LitHub is running a series of posts listing the books that define the decades of the twentieth century. This is the first, covering 1900-1909.
  • Emily Polson found Instagram posts from book designers showing covers that didn’t make the cut. (Book Riot)
  • Catherine Coldiron asks why novels like Stoner get praised while women and people of color are ignored. I never understood why Stoner became a surprise hit, honestly; this helps. (The Establishment)
  • Jess Carbert does not want to borrow a book from you. (Book Riot)
  • Kelly Faircloth has a fascinating history of the tale of Bluebeard as a dark current through pop culture and argues for it’s new relevance in the era of #MeToo. (Pictorial)
  • Would you like to read more contemporary poetry? Here’s how Emily Polson took the plunge. (Book Riot)