This week on the bookish internet

  • Thomas Schiff traveled around the world to take beautiful panoramic photos of libraries. (The Guardian)
  • Sean Braswell wonders if von Goethe’s The Sorrows of Young Werther might be the deadliest book ever written. (ZY)
  • Lyndsay Faye’s article suggests that the difference between pastiche and fan fiction is a lot like the difference between pornography and erotica. (It’s pastiche or erotica if read it, otherwise it’s fan fiction or pornography.) (LitHub)
  • Lorraine Berry remembers when she met a man who doesn’t read books by women. (Signature)
  • Political Corner
    • Ashley Bowen-Murphy discusses what might happen to our bookish world if we don’t fight for the NEA and the NEHthe NEA and the NEH. (Book Riot)
    • Even if he weren’t one of my favorite authors, I would love Neil Gaiman for his defence of libraries. (The Guardian)
    • Please consider signing this Every Library letter to support PBS, NEA, NEH, and IMLS (the museum and libraries fund) to your Congressional representatives. (Every Library)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Loganberry Books in Cleveland is doing something very clever for Women’s History Month. They’ve worked out a way to make you notice the women authors first. (Huffington Post)
  • Emily Temple ranks the best and worst literary muses. (LitHub)
    • On a side note, Helen Oyeyemi’s Mr. Fox was the most brilliant novel about muses and writing I’ve ever read. I highly recommend it, especially if you like books that will mess you up.
  • Scholars at the British Library think Jane Austen might have died from arsenic poisoning. Posthumous forensics is mostly pointless, but it sure is interesting. (New York Times)
  • Speaking of the British Library…on their Medieval Manuscripts blog, they’ve rounded up some of the oldest known works by women scribes. (Medieval Manuscripts Blog)
  • The book sniffing may have gone too far. Randy Kennedy writes about a library that has turned into a smell exhibit. (New York Times)
  • Sarah Laskow writes about why librarians find books by “anonymous” to be a pain in the tuchus. (Atlas Obscura)

This week on the bookish internet

  • The Mackenzie and Harris Type Foundry is probably the only kind of hot metal I would actually travel to see. (Atlas Obscura)
  • Jan Rosenberg is a strange bookish phenomena; she can actually get to the end of her to-read list. (Book Riot)
  • Lynn Neary reports on a new literary profession: sensitivity reader. (NPR)
  • Ellie Broughton ponders the popularity of lit-bots on Twitter. (LitHub)
  • Elizabeth Allen rounds up fourteen people you inevitably meet (but didn’t want to) at book groups. (Book Riot)
  • Eman Quotah has a thing or two to say about publishers who suddenly want to publish Muslim voices. (The Establishment)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Father Columba Stewart joins the ranks of the badass librarians by helping to save manuscripts from ISIS. (The Atlantic)
  • Daniel Pollack-Pelzner writes about the latest wave of Shakespeare revisionism. (The New Yorker)
  • Tirzah Price shares what she learned after being gifted a set of bookplates. (Book Riot)
  • Librarians are taking a stand against fake news and Trump. (The Guardian)
    • Of course, we’ve always been against fake news, but I have never seen so many syllabi and plans for classes by librarians to teach people how to recognize when they’re being manipulated by media.
  • On the fun side of things, Spencer Althouse rounded up literary tattoos from across the internet for our delectation. (Buzzfeed)

This fortnight on the bookish internet

  • Peter Derk has many theories about why grammar nazis drive us nuts. (LitReactor)
  • Zoe Dickinson shares her joy at meeting other bookish folk in her bookstore. (Book Riot)
  • Rivka Galchen and Benjamin Moser ponder two classic books that have been misunderstood. (New York Times)
  • Bookstores in major cities are hosting the Resistance. (New York Times)
  • George Sandeman reports on a major book heist in London. (The Guardian)
  • Would you pay £100 to visit this St. Petersburg Library for four hours? (The Guardian)
  • Trisha Brown makes a case against “women’s fiction” as a genre label. (Book Riot)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Learn more from Sophie Gilbert about Dr. Seuss’ anti-Nazi cartoons. (The Atlantic)
  • Zoe Dickinson apologizes to all the audiobooks she’s slept through. (Book Riot)
  • Rachel Wilkerson Miller tells the story of Emma Lazarus’ famous poem. (Buzzfeed)
  • In a bit of good political, bookish news, Virginia has tossed out the law requiring labeling on “sexually explicit” books…like Romeo and Juliet. (The Guardian)
    • Speaking of politics, sort of, here are some book recommendations from the seven countries affected by Trump’s Muslim ban. (Book Riot)
  • Jessa Crispin ponders why we enjoy dystopias so much. (The Baffler)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Lorraine Berry discusses the history of bibliomania and book hoarding. (The Guardian)
  • And speaking of humblebragging, Ashley Bowen-Murphy talks about the hardest books she’s ever read. (Book Riot)
  • Alison Ray shares a medieval illuminated manuscript that has an awful lot in common with modern comic books. (Medieval Manuscripts Blog)
  • Michiko Kakutani explains why we should all read 1984 now. (The New York Times)

This week on the bookish internet

  • I salute these street artists who correct graffiti in Quito. (mental_floss)
  • Lynne Truss shares the story of, possibly, the only author to be killed by a bad review. (The Guardian)
  • Boris Fishman has comically bad luck with translators of his work. (The New York Times)
  • And speaking of translation…Richard Lea rounds up a number of authors who are more popular in translation than they are in their native languages. (The Guardian)

This week on the bookish internet

  • I will never not share a round up of the weirdest things librarians have found in returned books. (Tin House Blog)
  • Zoe Dickinson works at a book store with no catalog! Here’s what she’s learned about navigating without a map. (Book Riot)
  • Looking for something funny to read? The Guardian asked some of the biggest names in fiction about their favorite funny books.
  • Things have gone very wrong with American education when a poet can’t answer questions about her work on two standardized tests. (Washington Post)
  • Courtney Tanner reports on books that are banned in the Utah prison system. (Salt Lake Tribune)
  • Emily Temple examines more than a century of books that have been called “the Great American novel.” What do you think? (LitHub)
  • Erin Blakemore digs up an excellent article from the JSTOR archives about underground publishing in the Netherlands during the Nazi occupation. (Daily JSTOR)