This week on the bookish internet

  • I wasn’t the only person thinking about translation this week. Tim Parks has a report on an event that delights me right to my bookish, word nerd core: competitive translation. (The New York Review of Books)
  • Laura Sackton makes me want to revise my reading spreadsheet. (Book Riot)
  • Sarah Seltzer points out what happens when successful women writers are targeted for scandal. (Jezebel)
  • Some predictions on what next year’s book covers will look like. (The Digital Reader)
  • This one is for my library and academic readers out there: Daniela Blei writes in praise of taxonomy. (The Atlantic)
  • Jennifer Gonzalez argues that we need to change how reading is taught so that it doesn’t kill the joy of reading. (The Cult of Pedagogy)
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This week on the bookish internet

  • It’s time for the worst sex in literature award! (The Guardian)
  • This is actually from 2014, but Geoffrey Chaucer’s advyse for the holidayes is always on point. (NPR)
  • Jennifer Daniel created a flowchart to help us buy books for people this holiday season. (New York Times)
    • Pair with Jessica Yang’s list of the five types of book recommenders. (Book Riot)
  • Merve Emre wonders what makes good readers and bad readers and why it matters. (Boston Review)
  • Kate McGeon shares a story that warms my bookish heart: Hernando Guanlao turned his home library into a shared library. (Woodpie)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Kelly Jensen rounded up 50 bookish articles from Atlas Obscura, one of my favorite sites. (Book Riot)
  • Lisa Levy has some important things to say about rape culture in crime fiction. (LitHub)
  • Danika Ellis has thoughts about book hangovers. (Book Riot)
  • Alison Flood reports on recent findings about how science fiction readers approach reading the genre. I’m of two minds about the findings. On one hand, readers deserve a bit of brain candy. On the other, I think science fiction writers could try harder to give their books some depth. (The Guardian)
  • Don’t say any of these things to library workers. Ever. (Book Riot)

This week on the bookish internet

  • “I resolved that one day, I, too, would learn the mysterious tongue of the frog people.” Emanuel Bergman reflects on the oddities of English and German. (LitHub)
  • Callie Ryan Brimberry reflects on the many times she’s read Night. (Book Riot)
  • Emily Midorikawa and Emma Claire Sweeney write about the friends of famous women writers. (The Millions)
  • The Academic Cat Lady has a write up of cats in medieval manuscripts. (The Academic Cat Lady)
  • Emily Polson reads in English and Spanish. (Book Riot)
  • Jer Thorp defines delightfully obscure library terms. (Medium)

This week on the bookish internet

Because I still haven’t finished reading Ivan’s War, I’m posting the weekly round up of bookish internet-y goodness early.

  • Kate McKean lists the 10 books types that she will give a hard no. (Electric Lit)
  • Zachary Littrell does not revise his book reviews. (Book Riot)
  • The Guardian has posted its list of the most beautiful books of the year.
  • Laura Oosterbeek shares the perks of giving up on reading goals. (Book Riot)
  • Michael Bierut offers thirteen ways to pick a font. I realize this isn’t very bookish, but I’m a big fan of typography and this is my blog. (It’s Nice That)
  • Rah Carter has some delightful suggestions for the next time you read in the bath. (Book Riot)

This week on the bookish internet

  • Language sometimes evolves like DNA, with random “mutations.” (Ars Technica)
  • Francine Prose is her usual eloquent self in this essay on problematic stories, sensitivity readers, and the American Heart kerfuffle. (New York Review of Books Daily)
  • I love this story about book spine poetry trash talking so much. (LAist)
  • James Ledbetter writes about one of my bookish peeves: British authors messing up American characters’ dialog. Authors, please keep your dialects straight! (The New Yorker)
  • Clay Andres writes in praise of books without plots. (Book Riot)
  • Halloween’s over, but it’s not too late to read this hilarious selection of excerpts from one star reviews of Dracula. (Biblioklept)

This week on the bookish internet

  • I’ve always loved the punchy definitions in Ambrose Bierce’s The Devil’s Dictionary. (The Paris Review)
  • Opening up the syllabus to feature writers of color should not be controversial but, sadly, that’s the case when Lola Olufemi wrote an open letter asking Cambridge University to do just that. (The Guardian)
  • Students in Biloxi can read To Kill a Mockingbird in the classroom again…but only with parental permission. For fuck’s sake. (The Sun Herald)
  • Eleanor Catton and Max Porter share the many roles of a literary editor. One wishes that Henry James’ editor had fought a little harder to untangle the author’s overly complicated sentences. (The Guardian)
  • Christopher de Hamel, the lucky bastard, got to see the Book of Kells. (LitHub)
  • Danika Ellis has reader imposter syndrome. (Book Riot)
  • Kerry Mansfield photographs worn (well-loved?) library books that have been withdrawn. I do love to see books that have been used, rather than pristine but faded on the shelves. (The Guardian)
  • And, just for Halloween: a story about a haunted library in Evansville, Indiana. (Book Riot)

This week on the bookish internet

This week on the bookish internet

This week on the bookish internet