bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • It really is true that all our favorites are problematic. This time, word is getting out from black literary scholars that Walt Whitman held racist ideas. (The Daily JSTOR)
  • Alison Flood reports on the removal from Barcelona schools of books deemed to be sexist. (The Guardian)
  • Allison M. Charette shares her experience traveling to Madagascar to meet the author she was in the process of translating and learn more about the world of Malagasy letters. (LitHub)
  • A fresh update on the legal tangle surrounding Kafka’s literary legacy. (The Guardian)
  • Marc Cooper shares Paco Taibo’s efforts to create “una república de lectores“—a republic of readers—in Mexico. (The Nation)
  • Saw Nang and Mike Ives discuss efforts by the Myanmarese government to crack down on thangyat, a traditional annual performance of satirical poetry. (The New York Times)
  • Emily Dickinson is really hard to translate. (The Paris Review)
  • B.D. McClay writes in praise of the thesaurus. (The Outline)
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bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • I will always accept an invitation to meet the oldest book in a library, especially when it’s the National Library of Israel. (Library Blog)
  • While he intended to argue in favor of accumulating (collecting) a lot of books, Howard Jacobson essentially revealed that he is a book hoarder. (BBC)
  • On the other hand, collecting books with inscriptions and then trying to find out more about the inscribers and recipients sounds like a lot of fun. (Los Angeles Review of Books Blog)
  • Roz Warren’s tips to make library staff happy during National Library Week should be used throughout the year. (Medium)
  • I recently read the amazingly erudite Catalogue of Shipwrecked Books, by Edward Wilson-Lee, about the extraordinary library planned by the son of Christopher Columbus. So I was delighted to learn that one of his lost catalogues was recently rediscovered. (The Guardian)
  • If I was into using email signatures, I might use this hack for adding poetry to my emails. (Lifehacker)
  • Salvador Dalí, book illustrator? (Artsy)
bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • Amelia Stymacks reports on volunteers creating libraries all over Indonesia. (Moby Lives)
  • Katy Waldman has some very good questions for what the hell is doing on with what is now being called “cancel culture.” (The New Yorker)
  • Andrei Smolnikov’s essay about Gulliver’s Travels and science is just brilliant. (Electric Literature)
  • I am so happy to know that I am not the only librarian who struggles to recommend books because my tastes are different from a lot of peoples. It comforts me no end to know that Anna Gooding-Call’s tastes are even weirder. (Book Riot)
  • Rohini Chaki’s article about Alexandre Dumas’ cookbook (yes, cookbook) just gets better and better. (Atlas Obscura)
  • Rebecca Makkai started a conversation on Twitter about the best overlooked books of the last decade. (Electric Literature)
  • Alexandra Schwartz writes in praise of Miriam Toews. (The New Yorker)
  • The Wayward Children series is going to be a TV show! (io9)
  • EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL! (Atlas Obscura)
bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • Do you need to pare down your book collection but don’t know how to do it? Peter Derk has 22 off-the-wall methods to get rid of books. (LitReactor)
  • Look at these incredible painted medieval books at Yale’s Beinecke library. (YaleNews)
  • Carrie V. Mullins wonders about book awards and questions whether we still need the Nobel Prize for Literature. (Electric Literature)
  • These pans of classic books from the New York Times‘ book reviews are brutal—except for the one for Lolita, which is absolutely correct.
    • And you can get a second dose of hatchet jobs from Book Marks. I have been savoring these slowly, reading only a few at a time, because they are pretty strong fare.
  • Emily Temple has cogent thoughts about Jack Kerouac’s bewildering advice for writers. (LitHub)
  • Laura Marie writes in praise of chef’s memoirs, which I also adore even if they make me very peckish. (Book Riot)

bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • Simone Jung has outstanding advice about when to DNF a book. (Book Riot)
  • Jeremy May has created what might be the most elegant art from discarded books I’ve ever seen. (My Modern Met)
  • I completely understand Beth Fish’s dilemmas of being a book blogger. (Beth Fish Reads)
  • Genevieve von Petzinger has a theory that pushes back the invention of writing by 5,000 years. (OpenCulture)
  • The idea of a book about Roald Dahl’s invented swears for children delights me no end. (The Guardian)
  • I also love the idea of writing love letters of one’s favorite books. (Book Riot)
bookish links

This week on the bookish internet