bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

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bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • Sophie Gilbert discusses feminist dystopias. Even though it’s heavy reading, it serves as a good guide to which novels to read and which can be skipped. (The Atlantic)
  • I can completely relate to Erin Mayers passion for checking out bookshelves everywhere she goes, but I admire her ability to pick up the books she finds regardless of what else is going on. (LitHub)
  • Gita Jackson explores the long, uncomfortable coda of J.K. Rowling’s expansion and “revisions” to Harry Potter. (Kotaku)
  • Jennifer Benka explores the power of poetry in times of upheaval. Poetry matters! (Electric Literature)
  • Simone Jung is a rebel who does not organize her books. (Book Riot)
  • Mara Wilson reflects on the beloved character Matilda Wormwood and what she might be up to now. This article includes illustrations by Sir Quentin Blake. (Vanity Fair)
bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • Sarah Fawn Montgomery makes a compelling argument for why it’s so important to teach the literature of “mad” women. Even without the gutting events of this week’s political circus, this excerpt from Montgomery’s memoir will make you want to punch a privileged white male. (LitHub)
  • Michelle Anne Schingler has created her own canon and has no fear about leaving out some traditional classics. (Book Riot)
  • Oscar Wilde had quite nice handwriting. (New York Times)
  • Ron Charles asks if we still need Banned Books Week. We do. (Washington Post)
  • Lydia has had enough of hot head heroines. (The Literary Lollipop)
  • Life is short. Thankfully, Tirzah Price has tips for DNFing books. (Book Riot)
bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

  • I love coming across lists of obscure and delightful words. Now I have to figure out how to use spanghew in conversation. (Merriam-Webster)
    • Pair with: The Oxford English Dictionary is calling on teenagers to help define contemporary slang. (The Guardian)
  • Eliza M. Dumais writes about what happened when dating people who read went wrong. (Electric Literature)
  • Roman Muradov delivers a deep look into his process for creating a cover for a “lost classic.” I just can’t get enough of these. (LitHub)
  • Another item for the bucket list: London’s poetry lion. (The Verge)
  • Oliver Tearle posts a series of bookish firsts from The Secret Library, a history of literature. (Interesting Literature)
  • Sam Jordison discusses Chaucer’s penchant for naughty jokes. (The Guardian)
  • The editors of Vulture listed the best 100 books of the century so far. Let the arguments commence! (Vulture)
bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

bookish links

This week on the bookish internet

bookish links

This fortnight on the bookish internet