Best books of 2013-2014

Since I can’t recommend every book I’ve read in the past twelvemonth (because I don’t think you all have that kind of time), here are the best ones:

  1. The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry, by Gabrielle Zevin: This is a sweet and moving story of a book store owner who suddenly becomes a father. If you’re a reader, this book is for you. 
  2. The Book Thief, by Marcus Zusak: Words are powerful, even when the world is falling apart. This book is captivating and beautiful.
  3. Ready Player One, by Ernest Cline: I adored this modern epic. It’s a great ride.
  4. The Word Exchange, by Alena Graedon: When words are commercialized, the effects are terrifying.
  5. Little Brother, by Cory Doctorow: Even though this book was written during the height of Patriot Act paranoia, it’s still chillingly relevant. Plus, it’s good, geeky fun.
  6. Longbourn, by Jo Baker: Writing anything new about Pride and Prejudice is next to impossible, but Jo Baker has created something amazing in her tale of the Bennett family’s servants.
  7. Strange Bodies, by Marcel Theroux: This is a delightfully bizarre story of resurrection and writing.
  8. In Paradise, by Peter Matthiessen: Holocaust literature will always be unsettling and vexed and unmoving, but this is one of the few that can offer catharsis.
  9. Night Film, by Marisha Pessl: I love ambiguous mysteries; you get more than one story for your money. 
  10. The Bloody Chamber, by Angela Carter: These are the the best fairy tale retellings I’ve ever found.
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